Although Leo Varadkar had signaled that Donald Trump would travel to Ireland in June this year there has been no communication from the White House

United States President Donald Trump will make a state visit to the United Kingdom on June 3 to 5, 2019 to mark the 75th anniversary of World War II's D-Day, it has been confirmed by Buckingham Palace.

However, as yet the US President has not released any plans for a state visit to Ireland, which he announced on St. Patrick’s Day he would take with Vice President Mike Pence later this year.

Ireland’s Taoiseach (Prime Minister) Leo Varadkar has previously signaled that Trump could visit Ireland when he is in Europe as part of the D-Day commemorations, in June.

Donald Trump speaking to the crowds at the annual Easter egg hunt.

Donald Trump speaking to the crowds at the annual Easter egg hunt.

On Tuesday afternoon, Buckingham Palace announced that the US President has accepted an invitation from Queen Elizabeth.

A statement released by the places said:

"The visit will take place from Monday 3rd June to Wednesday 5th June this year.

"President Trump and Mrs Trump previously joined The Queen for tea at Windsor Castle in July 2018."

Read more: Trump’s new Ambassador to Ireland pledges to uphold Good Friday Agreement

President Trump’s 2019 planned trip to Ireland

As yet there has been no contact between the White House and Ireland’s government. Officials have told the Irish Independent that the President’s visit to Ireland is likely to take place this summer.

However, as yet, there has been no contact between the White House and officials in Dublin.

Sources, on Tuesday, told the Irish Independent, that there has been no contact between the two parties government’s since the St. Patrick’s Day visit.

Over St. Patrick’s Day Trump had expressed that the planned on visiting Dublin before traveling to Doonbeg, in Country Clare, where he owns a hotel and golf course, which is being run by his family.

Trump is presented with a bowl of shamrocks on St. Patrick's Day.

Trump is presented with a bowl of shamrocks on St. Patrick's Day.

Donald Trump’s Trip to Europe

Donald Trump will, however, be visiting the United Kingdom, to celebrate the 75th anniversary of D-Day, the start of the invasion that led to the end of World War II.

Will in the UK Trump will take part in a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Theresa May, who continues to deal with the issue to Brexit, the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union.

After their three-day trip to the United Kingdom, Trump and the First Lady will travel to Normandy on June 6, at the invitation of the French President Emmanuel Macron, to mark the 75th Anniversary of D-Day at the Normandy American Cemetery at Colleville-sur-Mer.

Welcoming Donald Trump

It’s expected that the United State’s President’s plans to visit the United Kingdom will once again spark plans for renewed demonstrations. Last year thousands of people took to the streets to protest as he arrived.

Campaigners are already calling for the return of the baby “Trump Blimp”, a 20-foot effigy of the US President, which was flown over London’s Parliament Square, according to the Daily Mail.

Already Labour Members of Parliaments have made it clear that they would not welcome the US President.

Do you welcome the idea of Donald Trump visiting Ireland? Do you think he'll get a warm reception? Let us know in the comments section below. 

Guinness-march2019