On this day, January 30, in 1972 British soldiers shot dead 14 peaceful protesters in Derry. It is often known as the Bogside Massacre.

Bloody Sunday, often referred to as the Bogside Massacre, took place on January 30, 1972, when British paratroopers opened fire on a peaceful protest organized by the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association, protesting the poor treatment of Catholics in Northern Ireland.

Fourteen people in total were killed; 13 died instantly and another person died four months later as a result of his injuries.

British paratroopers take away civil rights demonstrators on "Bloody Sunday" after the paratroopers opened fire on a civil rights march, killing 14 civilians, January 30, 1972 in Derry, Northern Ireland (Getty Images)

British paratroopers take away civil rights demonstrators on "Bloody Sunday" after the paratroopers opened fire on a civil rights march, killing 14 civilians, January 30, 1972 in Derry, Northern Ireland (Getty Images)

Read more: What does Bloody Sunday Derry stand for today?

One of the most iconic images of the day was of Edward Daly, the Catholic priest photographed waving a bloodstained handkerchief as he attempted to bring one of those injured to safety. 

Bloody Sunday, Jan 30, 1972. pic.twitter.com/ZwpbgeQlOq

— David Blevins (@skydavidblevins) January 30, 2020

The then Fr. Daly had attended many several civil rights marches in the build-up to Bloody Sunday and was present when British soldiers began to fire on the unarmed citizens. Images of the 39-year-old Daly trying to bring the mortally wounded Jackie Duddy to safety were broadcast all over the world.

The priest’s later testimony that the British soldiers fired on the crowd with no provocation was rejected by the British government in 1972, but Daly continued to tell his story, eventually being proven accurate in 2010 following a $265 million, 12-year investigation. Bishop Daly died in August 2016.

The inquiry found that there was no justification for firing at the protestors and then British Prime Minister David Cameron formally apologized to the families of those killed or injured. It has since been confirmed that the families will also receive compensation.

A protest demonstration in London against the Bloody Sunday massacre when 13 civilians on a civil rights march were shot dead by the British Paratroopers in Derry City. (Photo by Central Press/Getty Images)

A protest demonstration in London against the Bloody Sunday massacre when 13 civilians on a civil rights march were shot dead by the British Paratroopers in Derry City. (Photo by Central Press/Getty Images)

Read More: Derry families want more British soldiers charged over Bloody Sunday

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