In the wake of Storm Ciara, Met Eireann has four active weather warnings across Ireland

As Storm Ciara finally moves on from Ireland, a wintry mix is descending upon the country causing further frustrations for Irish people.

Read More: Met Éireann issues weather warnings ahead of Storm Ciara

On Monday, Met Eireann, Ireland’s national meteorological service, had four national warnings in place, three yellow and one orange:

Status Yellow - Wind warning for Donegal, Galway, Leitrim, Mayo, Sligo, Clare and Kerry

Strong westerly winds continuing with mean speeds of 50 to 65km/h and gusts to 110km/h, highest in coastal areas.

A combination of Spring Tides and high seas will result in a risk of coastal flooding, especially around high tide.

Valid: 8 pm Monday, February 10 to 8 pm Tuesday, February 11

Issued: 11 am Monday, February 10


Status Orange - Wind warning for Donegal, Galway, Leitrim, Mayo, Sligo, Clare and Kerry

Storm Ciara will continue to produce very strong westerly winds in coastal areas with mean speeds of 65-80km/h and gusts generally between 110 and 130km/h.

A combination of Spring Tides and high seas will result in a significant risk of coastal flooding.

Valid: 6 am Monday, February 10 to 8 pm Monday, February 10

Issued: 5 pm Sunday, February 9

Status Yellow - Snow/Ice warning for Ireland

Widespread wintry showers on Monday and Tuesday with some snowfall accumulations, especially in the west and north. Some disruption to travel is possible, particularly over higher routes.

Valid: 12:01 am Monday, February 10 to 11:59 pm Tuesday, February 11

Issued: 12:00 Sunday 09/02/2020

Status Yellow - Wind warning for Ireland

Storm Ciara will continue to produce very strong west to southwest winds over Ireland with mean speeds of 50-65km/h and gusts generally of between 90 and 110km/h, higher in Atlantic coastal areas.

A combination of Spring Tides and high seas will result in a significant risk of coastal flooding.

Valid: 5 pm Sunday, February 9 to 8 pm Monday, February 10

Issued: 12:00 pm Sunday, February 9, updated: 5:25 pm Sunday, February 9

Met Eireann’s meteorologists said: “As Storm Ciara moves away today, colder air originating from Canada begins to feed down over Ireland. This will bring scattered wintry precipitation later tonight. The risk of snowfall increases during Monday and the risk will continue through Tuesday. While snow showers may develop anywhere they will occur chiefly in parts of the west and north, with some accumulations possible.

“The windy conditions that the country has experienced over the last few days will persist and coupled with the colder air it will feel bitterly cold, with significant wind chill.”

Read More: Scientist claims Irish bogs can lead the fight against climate change

Storm Ciara's damage

Over the weekend, Storm Ciara delivered considerable damage across Ireland, including flooding, downed trees, and power outages:

Kilbarrack firefighters have assisted with flooding near Sutton that coincided with the highest astronomical tide (HAT) #StormCiara #StormCíara pic.twitter.com/xNlxMscTqp

— Dublin Fire Brigade (@DubFireBrigade) February 9, 2020

Severe flooding in Sligo County particularly in Ballymote and surrounding area.Ballymote crew dealing with incidents throughout the night and early morning. Ensure to heed travel advice given on social media from Sligo County Council Facebook and Twitter pages. pic.twitter.com/ooa7u4ftoL

— Sligo Fire Service (@FireSligo) February 9, 2020

The R569 (Clonkeen to Kilgarvan) has been reduced to one lane.
Council staff on site. #StormCiara pic.twitter.com/IJdGdlt0Ek

— Kerry County Council (@countykerry) February 9, 2020

#StormCiara flooding in Ireland, rivers bursting their banks, roads flooded and rivers still rising. Phenomenal amounts of rainfall in 24 hours. pic.twitter.com/B26DXwyM5S

— Dr Neil Entwistle (@SalfordHydro) February 9, 2020

Snow in Ireland

And on Monday, people across Ireland began sharing pictures of snow - or #sneachta - as it began to fall:

Road-Users are advised to aware of heavy snowfall in the Sallygap and Wicklow Gap areas, which are totally impassable. Please avoid these locations. pic.twitter.com/oyL86rE0Ke

— An Garda Síochána (@GardaTraffic) February 10, 2020

More images of the traffic on the Glenshane Pass during the passing snow showers which are blowing through the area quite quickly. @newslineweather @BBCNITravel @WeatherCee @barrabest @angie_weather @NWSharingZone @TrafficwatchNI pic.twitter.com/zUUekLW5rj

— Aerial Vision NI (@aerialvisionni) February 10, 2020

More snow on the way at the top of Slieve Gallion @newslineweather @angie_weather @barrabest @cee @geoff_maskell @BBCWthrWatchers pic.twitter.com/fQdCDQiC77

— David Brownlow (@DBdigitalimages) February 10, 2020

The show has started to fall in BALLYMENA! Careful out on the roads. Call in with folks living on their own! @newslineweather @WeatherCee @angie_weather @barrabest pic.twitter.com/ihwhZb3eVE

— Cllr Eugene Reid (@eugenereid) February 10, 2020

Heavy snow now above Carlow. pic.twitter.com/9Di843psaF

— Carlow Weather (@CarlowWeather) February 10, 2020

It’s snowing in County Clare! 😃 pic.twitter.com/od34IAhGbQ

— Petula Martyn (@petulamartyn) February 10, 2020

Read More: Irish photographer captures wintertime in Ireland like you've never seen it before

Snow in the Sally Gap, Co Wicklow on February 10 in the wake of Storm Ciara.An Garda Síochána, Twitter