5,400 people are being granted Irish citizenship in six ceremonies taking place on Thursday, June 20, and Friday, June 21 at the Convention Centre Dublin.

The Irish citizenship ceremonies will see applicants from 143 countries around the world and living in 30 counties on the island of Ireland being conferred as Irish citizens.

The Presiding Officers at the ceremonies are retired judges Justice Deirdre Murphy and Justice Bryan McMahon who will administer the Declaration of Fidelity to the Irish Nation and Loyalty to the State.

Thursday and Friday's Irish citizenship ceremonies follow the ceremonies held in Killarney, Co Kerry last week which saw 4,800 applicants attend.

In total, 10,000 people will be conferred with Irish Citizenship this month.

June 20, 2024: Myra Escalona, Kristine Joy Guck, and Monique Roa from the Philippines at the Irish Citizenship Ceremony in Dublin. (RollingNews.ie)

June 20, 2024: Myra Escalona, Kristine Joy Guck, and Monique Roa from the Philippines at the Irish Citizenship Ceremony in Dublin. (RollingNews.ie)

Taoiseach Simon Harris said on Thursday: “It is a great pleasure to once more attend a Citizenship Ceremony - my first opportunity to do so as Taoiseach.

"These ceremonies are magnificent celebrations of all that it is to be Irish.

"The richness of our nation isn’t measured in wealth. It is measured in people. Our newest citizens are part of us, and we of them.

"I am very grateful to those who have made Ireland their home. They contribute to the rich fabric of our nation and make exceptional contributions in a range of areas - from health and home care, to culture and construction, to transport and tourism.

"I am very grateful to each of our new citizens for choosing Ireland as the home of their hearts and the home of our future.”

Taoiseach @SimonHarrisTD attended his first Irish citizenship as Taoiseach earlier today.
The Taoiseach said:
"The richness of our nation isn’t measured in wealth. It is measured in people. Our newest citizens are part of us, and we of them." pic.twitter.com/3HXd6ROAsh

— MerrionStreet.ie (@merrionstreet) June 20, 2024

Ireland's Minister for Justice Helen McEntee said: “Citizenship is about belonging. It connects you to this country, to your neighbours, and the generations that came before.

"Citizenship in Ireland comes with both rights and responsibilities. The rights protect your freedom and ensure that you have a voice in the direction our country takes.

"Citizenship also brings responsibilities. I encourage you to participate in your communities and share your skills, traditions and cultures, which can only enrich ours.

"My heartfelt congratulations go out to all our newest citizens conferred at this week’s citizenship ceremonies. Ireland is all the better for having you here and you are valued members of our society.”

June 20, 2024: Ireland's Minister for Justice Helen McEntee at the Irish Citizenship Ceremony. (RollingNews.ie)

June 20, 2024: Ireland's Minister for Justice Helen McEntee at the Irish Citizenship Ceremony. (RollingNews.ie)

Among the thousands of people receiving their Irish citizenship this week is Shaykh Dr. Umar Al-Qadri, who was born in Pakistan and raised in The Netherlands from a young age.

Having lived in Ireland for 21 years, he is the founder of the Irish Muslim Council and this month became the first migrant to run in Ireland's European Parliament elections, but did not win a seat.

I am absolutely thrilled to have received Irish citizenship today after living in Ireland for 21 years. Ireland has been my home for so many years, and I feel a deep connection to the people, culture, and values of this beautiful country. 🇮🇪☘️ #Ireland #Citizenship #irishpic.twitter.com/o9MezML176

— Shaykh Dr Umar Al-Qadri (@DrUmarAlQadri) June 20, 2024

Meanwhile, the Department of the Taoiseach noted in a statement on Thursday that the Citizenship Division has introduced significant changes to speed up the applications process for applicants, including the introduction of an online digital application, online payments, and eVetting.

These changes have significantly reduced the processing times which had lengthened due to the limits placed on staff attendance in the office during the pandemic.

In recent years, the median processing time for applications had peaked at 19 months, however, going forward, the majority of new applicants can expect to receive a decision in approximately 12 months where documentation is in order.

It is the case that some international checks can take a considerable amount of time and are largely out of the control of the Department.

Over the last two years, the Citizenship Division has gone from processing around 12,000 applications a year to processing over 20,000 applications in 2023. Already in 2024, 16,000 decisions have been made.

Last year, Citizenship Division more than doubled the number of ceremonies available to applicants with 15 held over the course of the year. This was a significant increase on the six Citizenship Ceremonies held in 2022. It is envisioned that this number will be significantly surpassed this year, with 15 ceremonies already taking place by the end of June.