Think the Irish don't have enough imagination to give their food unusual names, think again! Take a gander (Irish slang for look) at these ten gems.

The Irish food industry is booming. Its success is down to using the wonderful rich produce available in the Emerald Isle. Over the past decade, more traditional Irish fare has also made a comeback. 

What can we say... sometimes what you need is a traditional Irish classic, especially for St. Patrick's Day.

Champ

No not Muhammad Ali, a type of mashed potato that is whipped up with milk and butter.



Back Rashers

No not some tropical disease but the Irish name for bacon. Sizzling rashers on the pan, sweet Irish tea, and soda bread – ah, the perfect breakfast.



Drisheen

No, not some obscure Irish town but beautiful black pudding made from cows or pigs blood – a rare delicacy.

Which traditional #Irish dish is known as drisheen? #WOTD http://t.co/EBrInUo1n1 pic.twitter.com/ifsawrtguX

— Collins Dictionary (@CollinsDict) July 15, 2014

Crubeens

No, not some swear word, but wonderful pigs feet or trotters. Perfect in a sandwich.

Great food as always @miyazakicork 👍

The best #crubeens I've ever tasted! Still licking my fingers😀😋#Cork pic.twitter.com/1Oydlklxlj

— Silenus (@Bia_agus_deoch) June 3, 2017

Tripe

No, not some nonsense someone is talking to you but edible offal from the stomachs of some animals—er, think I’ll pass.

Photo: daveleb/Flickr

Photo: daveleb/Flickr



Colcannon

Not your distant American relative but a form of mashed potato mixed with cabbage,  not unlike champ.



Irish trifle

Not some insignificant thing, but actually a beautiful dessert made with fresh cream, jello, and custard.

Photo: Brooke Raymond/Flickr

Photo: Brooke Raymond/Flickr

Boxty

No, not someone who wants to box you but yet another variation on the humble potato—which proves that the Irish still love the spud.



Dublin Coddle

Not what you do with the missus, but a dish made of sausage and bacon – delicious.



Fish fingers

No, not fish that can count, but fish in finger shape cooked in deep batter – delicious.

Read more: How to make boxty, traditional Irish potato cakes

* Originally published in March 2014.

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