Salty fries might seem a no-brainer, but this New York speciality isn't what you think.

Chefs who swear by 'salt potatoes' aren't just talking about a pinch of salt on a portion of fries. Indeed, some food pros in central New York use a huge amount of salt in the potato water (approx. two cups of salt for every eight of water) in order to create a white-crusted, savory potato that’s creamy in consistency. 

This style of 'taters dates back to local history in Syracuse.  According to Atlas Obscura, Onondaga County (where Syracuse is situated) was once the leading salt producer in the US. Syracuse was even nicknamed 'Salt City' at one stage.

Read More: Celebrate Irish potato day with these lovely spud recipes

The website writes that in the 19th century, Irish salt workers would bring sacks of potatoes to work for their lunch.

"While boiling down brine from Syracuse’s salt springs, workers would add in the small, white potatoes that became the spud of choice for salt potatoes. Soon, the potatoes were a staple."

The salt potatoes took off in popularity - causing people to compare them to the equivalent of Boston's baked beans or Milwaukee's omnipresent frankfurters.

The 'delicacy' isn't as prevalent anymore - although some grocery stores in Syracuse still sell bags of spuds with just the right amount of salt included to perfect the dish!

Read More: Celebrate Irish potato day with these lovely spud recipes

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