The critics have taken to Twitter claiming that U2 is “cashing in” on the history of violence in Northern Ireland after recreating scenes of a bombing in New Lodge, Belfast for an upcoming music video.

The photos from the video shoot, which took place on Wednesday, show the aftermath of a bomb blast in a debris-strewn street with wounded actors running from homes bewildered and grabbing loved ones. There have been no reported sightings of Bono, the Edge, Larry Mullan and Adam Clayton on set.

It is being speculated that the footage will be used for their upcoming music video for the single “The Troubles,” from the new album “Songs of Innocence,” which oddly is not about Northern Ireland’s violent past. It may also be for "Raised by Wolves," which talks about a bombed street, or “Every Breaking Wave.”

This Vine shows the recreation of the aftermath of an fake explosion from afar:

One of the Dublin band’s most famous songs “Sunday Bloody Sunday” described the horror felt by an observer of the violence in the North focusing on Bloody Sunday in Derry, when the British troops shot dead peaceful protestors.

The site where this week’s filming took place, the predominantly Catholic area of New Lodge, witnessed a great deal of violence during the Troubles. Located on the edge of Belfast’s city center, it has a history of active republicanism and is surrounded by loyalist areas.

On December 4, 1971 a bomb, claimed by the Ulster Volunteer Force, exploded in McGurk’s Bar, killing 15 Catholics.

A stronghold of the Provisional IRA, New Lodge was also the site of almost daily rioting and gun battles between the IRA and the British Army and loyalist paramilitaries in the 1970s and during periods of high political tension such as during the 1981 Hunger Strikes.

The photos and footage of the shoot are eerily similar to the real scenes of destruction witnessed during the Troubles.

The public took to Twitter to vent:

While some believe the shoot is an insult to the area while others believe that recreating scenes such as these will serve to remind the world of Ireland’s troubled past.

What do you think? Is recreating these devastation scenes wrong?

Let us know if the comment section below.

Public feel “Songs of Innocence” musicians are “cashing in” on Northern Ireland’s violent past.Twitter