Bill O'Reilly has spent years attacking the secular forces that he says are attacking Christianity. 

He has railed against the “war on religion” and the “war on Christmas” and this week he's claiming that Christians are now being “verbally killed.” 

But some critics are asking what is O'Reilly doing discussing war at all when in recent weeks he has been caught misrepresenting his own war stories.

Certainly Fox Business Network guest John Stossel was having none of O'Reilly's “crybaby” talk.

“Christians aren’t being killed” in America Stossel said. O’Reilly countered, “No, not yet,” eventually adding, “They’re verbally being killed.”

But here's the thing Bill, you can't be verbally killed. You can however be verbally criticized. And you should know all about verbal criticism because after all you've made your fortune criticizing others. 

But apparently O'Reilly and many other conservatives now want to suggest that it's “verbal murder” of some kind to criticize them.

Do you remember this ploy from the school yard? It's called “I'll talk and you'll listen” and it's also called, “I will pummel you and you will take it.”

O'Reilly is just the latest member of this ever expanding conservative group trying out this idiotic “don't criticize us, we'll die” shut-up approach. 

Meanwhile critics say that although O'Reilly insists Christians are being “verbally killed” every week he has no time at all for the claims that young black men are being targeted and killed by some U.S. law enforcement officers.

“Talking Points believes that insane views of the world can poison actual societies,” O'Reilly said recently. “That is what these anti-police people are trying to do.”“Yes, there is police abuse and it must be punished. There’s no excuse for it. But no, America is not a place where minority people are targets of organized injustice. Thank God most of us seem to know that.”

According to O'Reilly it's only the rights of conservative Christians we need to worry about.

Irish American Fox host Bill O'Reilly: It is an occupational hazard as journalists tend to exaggerate the truth.