If there’s anything you can count on in Ireland, it’s that it will rain and it will rain a lot. Being a small island with the whole force of the giant Atlantic ocean facing down on us, it can be expected that we don’t see the sun too often.

We often like to joke about the whole two weeks of Irish summer that we may enjoy, but unfortunately this year, two weeks of sun would seem like a miracle.

Summer 2015 can officially be declared the worst Irish summer in years with wind, rain and even frost causing the whole country to pull back out their coats and settle in for a full year of winter.

Irish weather service Met Éireann released their review of July’s bleak and miserable weather this week and the records are so depressing that it even makes us have happy to be battling between the baking sidewalks and arctic A/C of NYC instead.

First off, it’s been absolutely freezing. Claremorris, Co Mayo, recorded its coldest July temperature since 1965 while Cork Airport; Johnstown Castle, Co Wexford; Mullingar, Co Westmeath; and Shannon Airport all reported their coldest July since 1988.

On average, temperatures in July 2015 have dipped by 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit but places such as Markree Castle in Sligo have seen the temperature drop by as much as 3.8 F.

In fact, it’s been so cold that the luscious greens that should covering the Emerald Isle in mid-summer have been glazed over with frost on separate nights in both Mullingar and Athenry.

The month began on a much sunnier footing with temperatures reaching a balmy 73 F in Mountdillon, Co Roscommon on July 1.

It has done nothing but plummet since then, however, with July 24 in the same town only reaching a measly 37 F.

The East coast has not been much better and Dublin Airport recorded 39 F on July 15, its lowest July temperature since the station opened in 1942.

Not only was it cold but the rain just kept coming. Rainfall was above average across the country with Cork airport recording its wettest July since 2009 at a massive 158.8mm of rain.

And even though you’d been looking forward to that “grand stretch in the evening” since last fall, even that was ruined by the dark days. Only Belmullet in Co. Mayo managed to escape the dark clouds (for a while at least) and succeeded in clocking in 14 hours of sunshine - but only on July 5.

Of course, no miserable Irish summer would be complete without the wind. Wind speeds reached gale force three times throughout the past month and average speeds throughout the country were the highest recorded in anything between 5 to 27 years.

And in case you hadn’t noticed, throughout July, Irish people were pretty miserable.

Here’s hoping for a better August and September!

The Emerald Isle had 20 years of non-stop rain just around the time of Noah's Biblical flood.Getty Images/Ingram Publishing