The former close advisor to President Obama was in Ireland to research her Irish roots as part of RTÉ show “Who Do You Think You Are?”

Irish-born former US Ambassador to the UN Samantha Power has expressed her relief that President Donald Trump will not be visiting Ireland this coming November. Within the space of a week, the US President recently announced and canceled a trip to Ireland, causing much confusion for the Irish government and public.

The Dubliner has said that she believes the trip “wouldn’t go well” and that it is “better for everyone” that Trump doesn't grace Irish shores.

Power was born in Ireland but moved to the US when she was nine. In her adult life, she rose to prominence as one of President Barack Obama’s closest aides and was chosen for the role of UN ambassador under his administration.

Read more: Samantha Power: KKK’s David Duke sees himself as having a friend in the White House

Irish-born Samantha Power confirmed by Senate as next US ambassador to UN by 87-to-10 margin in last vote before August recess

— Simon Carswell (@SiCarswell) August 1, 2013

She left the role in January 2017 with Trump’s inauguration but claims that she is still not getting much sleep knowing he is in the White House.

“I’m in bed earlier, but I don’t sleep better because of Trump. It’s very hard to sleep easy at night with the current arrangement. But hope springs eternal,” she told the RTÉ Guide.

Power was speaking to RTÉ ahead of the airing of her episode of the show “Who Do You Think You Are?” in which she returns to Ireland to look further into her Irish roots. While the Harvard Professor has always maintained a strong connection with the country, holding her wedding in Kerry in 2008, the show offered her the opportunity to look further back into her family history.

“Nothing makes a place more real than one’s own personal connection to it,” she explained, stating that it was “incredibly important” that her two children—son Declan, nine, and daughter Rian, six—came with her during filming.

“The really dramatic connections between our family members and Irish history, that’s what’s going to bring it home for them and that was wonderful.”

Do you agree with Samantha Power? Let us know in the comments section, below. 

Former United States Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power attends the 2017 Time 100 Gala at Jazz at Lincoln Center on April 25, 2017, in New York City. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for TIME