The Irish have the most attractive accent in the Britain and Ireland. The Irish accent came up tops in a list of accents just above "BBC English" and the Welsh accent.

The poll, conducted by YouGov, surveyed 2018 British adults on 12 of the main accents. The results indicate that the Southern Ireland accent is the hottest of the lot.

Six-one percent of respondents said the Southern Irish accent was most attractive, while just 19 percent were not fans.

“Received Pronunciation,” also known as “BBC English,” came in second place followed by the soft lilting Welsh accent, which came in as the third most attractive accent.

The Northern Irish accent proved to be pretty divisive with 42% finding it attractive and 37% finding it unattractive.

According to the YouGov poll the Birmingham accent is the least attractive.

They said the “Birmingham accent, more specifically 'Brummie', has lost the battle of appeal…20 points below than the second-lowest: 'Scouse', the accent of Liverpool.

Southern Ireland, which for a long time had a shrinking population largely due to emigration (which means the accent is well-known worldwide), is the best accent to have for being considered attractive. It scores net 42, 11 points ahead of the standard accent of mainly the Southern areas of Britain – Received Pronunciation, or 'BBC English'.”

Nice one, lads!

There are some vast differences in perceived attractiveness of accents by age. The West Country accent is considered the most attractive to over-60s. 63% of the oldest generation see it as attractive, compared to only 22% of 18-24 year-olds. The opposite perception has developed for Northern Irish, with most 18-24 year-olds (54%) seeing it as attractive compared to only 37% of over-60s. Geordie, the Newcastle accent, also has a greater appeal to older British people.

Additionally, there is a tendency to like one's own. People in London rated cockney net -16, while overall it is disliked by -30; Glaswegian is liked by net 7 in Scotland, but a greatly different -29 among Britain as a whole. The pattern continues for the other regions and their respective accents as well.

*Originally published in Decemner 2014. 

 

Scientist believe the "ginger gene" evolved 50,000 years ago when humans moved north from Africa to EuropeGetty Images/iStockphoto