Remote Irish island seeks Americans fleeing Donald Trump presidency

“Winter can be hard but they’d find it very peaceful here,” says Inishturk local.

American citizens, who are terrified at the prospect of Donald Trump becoming the next President, have been urged to consider relocating to one of Ireland's remotest islands.

Inishturk, off Co. Mayo, has seen its once thriving population plummet to just 58, with only three pupils attending the local primary school.

The dwindling community's leaders are desperately trying to entice families to move over to breathe new life into the isolated outpost and secure its future.

And they stressed their tranquil isle, located nine miles off the coast, could make the ideal permanent refuge for those who cannot face life in a United States headed by Donald Trump.

Mary Heanue, Inishturk development officer, said: "Our big concern is employment and trying to encourage families to move over here because the population is declining.

"The island featured on an Irish TV documentary last year which gave us great publicity and a good few extra bookings. But we ended up having a terrible summer and a lot of people canceled.

"I've heard there are quite a few people in America looking to move to Ireland and other countries if Donald Trump becomes president. I'd like them to know that we'd love to see them consider moving over here.

Read more: A guide on moving to Ireland in case Donald Trump is elected

"They'd be given a huge welcome and they'd find this is a fantastic place to live and to bring up children. Their kids would probably get the best education anywhere in the country too, because the teacher to pupil ratio is nearly one-on-one.

"Although winters can be hard and it's the kind of life that wouldn't necessarily suit everyone, they'd find it very peaceful here and they'd soon find out there's nowhere as nice in the world on a summer's day than here."

According to leading media website Mashable, Ireland represents one of the best options for US citizens looking to flee from a country run by President Trump.

And according to another report, applications for Irish passports from British nationals are also on the rise, as fears grow about the UK leaving the European Union after the June EU membership referendum..

A recent report in The Guardian found that the number of British-born people applying for Irish passports based on their ancestry has risen sharply in the past year amid concerns of a Euro exit.

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