New York bar owner and Dropkick Murphys front-man in charity wager in Super Bowl challenge

Foley's in midtown Manhattan

With Super Bowl XLVI between the New York Giants and the New England Patriots just days away, two New York and Boston bar owners announced a wager which will see the losing team’s bar donate a portion of their shepherd’s pies sales to charity, and the bar owner himself will ship up to Boston or down to New York to work a bartending shift dressed in the “enemy” team’s colors.

Ken Casey, the front man of the popular Dropkick Murphys rock band and owner of McGreevy’s Bar in Boston, and Irishman Shaun Clancy, owner of Foley’s Pub in Midtown Manhattan, are running a bet over who will win the championship final in Indianapolis this Sunday.

“We are both sporting men and we both love a good bet,” Casey, who is currently on tour with the Dropkick Murphys in Europe, told the Irish Voice.

The losing team’s bar will donate $1 per pie to the winner’s charity of choice, based on the amount of shepherd’s pie sold from Super Bowl Sunday through Major League Baseball’s opening day on March 28.



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The defeated bar owner will also have to work a shift in the victor’s bar, wearing the enemy team’s colors.

“Clancy better add some red and white to all that blue he's wearing. He's going to be making a 200 mile drive north, wearing a Tom Brady jersey and pouring us pints of Sam Adams," said a confident Casey.

In a move which sparked some controversy this week, Clancy, who is originally from Cavan, banned the sale of Boston brewed Sam Adams Lager for the big game on Sunday.

“It's a bit of fun.  I am not out to maliciously hit anyone with this. It was a case of let’s get behind the Giants and let’s promote everything New York,” said Clancy, owner of Foley’s, who famously banned the singing of “Danny Boy” in his bar on St. Patrick's Day in 2008.

“The key is to have a bit of fun and raise some money,” he added.

Casey, who will be performing in Holland this Sunday, says that despite not being in the U.S. the band will not miss the biggest sporting event of the year.

“We paid the venue we are playing that night in Holland to let us stay late and watch the game which starts at 12:30 a.m.,” he told the Irish Voice.

If the Patriots win, Casey is planning to donate the proceeds to the Claddagh Fund, which helps under-funded non-profit organizations in Boston and Philadelphia.

If it is a Giant victory, Clancy has selected New York Yankees pitcher David Robertson's High Socks for Hope Foundation, which helps tornado victims in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.