Irish forced out of Gaddafi’s Libya return home safely

People gather at the site where a petrol tanker exploded near the compound of Libyan leader Muammar Gadaffi in Tripoli

Read more: Irishman escapes Libya as a Turk

An Irish teacher who was working in Libya has spoken about how he was forced to leave the country without his belongings.

Liam Grant from Newtowncunningham, Co. Donegal was working as a physical education teacher at the prestigious International School of Martyrs in Tripoli. His pupils included the grandchildren of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, a grand-nephew of Saddam Hussein as well as children of diplomats, ambassadors and ministers.

Grant was enjoying a mid-term vacation in Malta when the trouble erupted in the capital.

"We had a week off so nine of us had headed to Malta for a friend's birthday, but when we saw what was happening during the protests, (some of us) decided not to go back," he told the “Belfast Telegraph.”

Speaking from his home in Donegal, the 24-year-old said that some of the group had returned to Tripoli but were forced to leave.

After news of the uproar spread, Grant was concerned that his family would be worried about his well being.

"When there was a virtual news blackout I knew my parents and friends back home would be concerned," he said.

The NUI Galway graduate was forced to leave all his belongings behind but is very glad to be home.

"There is no future for me in Libya. If Tripoli falls I'm sure the school would no longer exist, as it has such links to the old regime," he said.

Read more: Irishman escapes Libya as a Turk