A Belfast mural that pays tribute to the Ballymurphy victims

Read more: Bloody Sunday families demand prosecutions for guilty parties

The families of the 11 people shot dead by the British Army in Ballymurphy in 1971 met with Northern Ireland’s First Minister Peter Robinson. It was the relatives first meeting with  the First Minister.

Over 36 hours between 9 and 11 August 1971 the Parachute Regiment shot dead 11 unarmed civilians in the west Belfast housing estate, in a mass killing that has been called Belfast’s Bloody Sunday. Those who were killed included a local priest and a 45-year-old mother. All were unarmed.

Their deaths occurred during the British Army's so-called Operation Demetrius, which involved the internment of anyone suspected of paramilitary activity.

John Taggart, whose father was killed during the massacre, told the press that the families now want Robinson to endorse their campaign for an independent investigation into the shootings.

Taggart added the fact that Robinson had agreed to meet with the families was a very encouraging sign.

In November of last year the families also lobbied politicians in Westminster as part of their longstanding campaign for an independent inquiry.

Read more: Bloody Sunday families demand prosecutions for guilty parties