Paramotor pilot Oisin Creagh.

An Irish adventurer is just days away from making history by becoming the first person ever to fly from Ireland to Africa with a lawnmower-powered engine strapped to his back.

Paramotor pilot Oisin Creagh set off on his epic 2,000 mile expedition, one of the longest such journeys ever undertaken, just over two weeks ago.

The 52-year-old, who's a self-employed Cork-based architect, has since successfully navigated a meticulously-planned flight path, after setting off from Northern Ireland and flying over Scotland and England, across the English Channel to Calais.

Averaging a distance of about 140 miles a day, Creagh has since flown over France, the soaring Pyrenees mountain range and down to central Spain where he is now located.

With less than 400 miles remaining of his history-making adventure, the Dublin-born father-of-two, who's also an accomplished sailor and scuba diver, said he hopes to cross the Straits of Gibraltar to arrive in Morocco in north Africa as early as next Sunday.

Creagh said his paramotor, which consists of a back-mounted two-stroke engine-powered propeller and a parachute-style wing, has so far stood up well to the challenge.

"It's gone very well and the progress has been good.  It's certainly been a big logistical challenge.  Getting everything prepared for this journey was a huge task in itself,” he said.

"And as far as I know, nobody has ever done a journey like this on a paramotor.  The distance is unusual, as is some of the terrain I've been flying over, like the Pyrnenees.

"One of the biggest obstacles has been the heat because that really restricts the amount of time you can spend flying. 

"The heat means I can't fly as many hours as I'd like to during the day, but as things stand at the moment, I'd be hoping to do the final crossing from Gibraltar on Sunday."

When flying, the experienced paramotorist is armed with a bluetooth headset which enables him to communicate with air traffic controllers and his one-man support team following overland in a camper van.

Although he needed to soar to over 6,000 feet to clear the Pyrnenees mountain range between France and Spain, most of his short flights, timed for early mornings and late afternoons, have been at a relatively low altitude of about 1,500 feet.

The adventure has so far raised over €6,000 ($6,800) for Irish-based international development organization, Gorta-Self Help Africa.

For more information, and to chart Creagh's progress, see and Flyafrica on Facebook.

Here's a clip of Creagh in action, posted on Facebook by Drone Ireland: