Glenn BeckFOX NEWS

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Glenn Beck spent nearly 30 minutes on his Wednesday radio show praising the “Spider-Man: Turn off the Dark” musical. Although the show is now the most expensive show that has ever been produced by Broadway and has been riddled with cast and technical problems although it hasn’t even opened Beck gave the show rave reviews.

The controversial host said it was “by far the best show I've ever seen." He said the music was “brilliant…hit after hit after hit”, the performances were “unbelievable.”

He even compared Reeve Carney, who plays the leading role to Michael Bublé. He said “He has the vocal quality of Michael Bublé."

He said “After you couldn’t get a ticket to ‘Spider-Man’ and you’ve offered a kidney for it, go see ‘Wicked.’ I mean, you’ve got two kidneys. Don’t give both kidneys up — go see ‘Wicked’ before you give both kidneys. But give a kidney to go see ‘Spider-Man.’ I’m telling you, mark my words, it’s being panned right now, nobody’s saying good stuff about it. I’m telling you, you go buy your ticket — you buy your ticket now, if you’re thinking about coming to New York, because when this thing opens and it’s starting to run, you will not be able to get tickets to this for a year.

“This is one of those shows, this is the ‘Phantom’ of the 21st century. This is history of Broadway being made. I sat next to the casting director, by chance, and I said, ‘You, sir, are part of history.’”

Beck even had some ideas on why the show isn’t doing well with the critics. He said the villain is an “atheist, God-like scientist” who is collaborating with a Big Brother government to use global warming to advance his schemes. He believes that New Yorkers are being snobby and turning their liberal noses up at the storyline.

However he predicts that the show will be a massive hit.

Read more: Glenn Beck replaced by Mike Gallagher due to poor ratings

Read more: U2’s Bono likes Broadway ‘Spider-Man’s’ progress