Immigrants at Ellis Island.via SaveEllisIsland.org

So which Irish are you? Shanty or lace curtain, narrowback or donkey, Mick or Paddy?

The Irish in America did not come in one size fits all. While they might have all been equal off the Famine boat, they soon moved in different classes after they arrived.

All Irish started as shanty Irish, a term for a one room cabin really. Five Points in New York and South Boston teemed with them.

Shanty meant rough, uncouth, usually a drinker.

Irish arrive at Ellis Island in New York. Credit: File photo

Irish arrive at Ellis Island in New York. Credit: File photo

Then came lace curtain Irish when they managed to move out of Five Points and move uptown or even more prosperous, to Long Island or upstate. Then you became lace curtain, so-called because you could afford them for your windows.

In Boston, the Kennedy clan would have made it to lace curtain in quick march fashion. Many of their contemporaries stayed behind in the shanty.

It was a real divide. Lace curtain went to the best schools (Catholic of course) and would have been on nodding terms with powerful potentates, like an archbishop.

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They vacationed at places like Hyannisport or Rockaway. If they did really well, a summer home was in the offing.

Shanty Irish stayed put except for the frequent visits to the shebeen, or little pub.

They made their living by hands, raised large families and barely were acknowledged by the princes of the church.

Irish men in Five Points, New York. Credit: File photo

Irish men in Five Points, New York. Credit: File photo

Strangely, as the years have gone by, the shanty background has been romanticized and many folks prefer to say they’re shanty Irish first.

Lace curtain carried with it a whiff of derision, folks trying to be to like the WASPS or people perceived as their betters.

Then there is the narrowback/donkey stand off.

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Easily enough explained, narrowbacks were sons of emigrants who never worked as hard as their fathers and had an easy time of it - hence the narrow back.

Donkeys were the Irish off the boat, working as hard as ever but sometimes held in contempt.

As for Micks and Paddy's, very little difference, Paddy was a derogatory term in Britain mainly. Micks were usually in America and the name didn't carry the same negativity as Paddy. Harp is another long forgotten insult.