Brian Kelly discusses home farewell to Michael Floyd, avoids Boston friends and family

Brian Kelly will be facing huge pressure this weekend , but it will not all be from the Boston College football team .

The Boston native knows family and friends will be calling incessantly to get tickets for the game at Notre Dame stadium.

"There's a lot of requests for tickets," Kelly told the Associated Press . "I don't even pick up the phone."

Indeed Kelly may face more pressure of the field from family and Boston fans than on this field. BC are having their worst year in over a decade and are only 3-7.

It will also be senior day at Notre Dame, the last chance to say goodbye to some of the greats, especially wide receiver Michael Floyd.

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Kelly knows it will be emotional "Emotions are fine because it's your last home game, and you should feel those things naturally. I think when you get emotional is where you can run into problems," he said. "We talk about our players staying within themselves all year. So I'm not really concerned that we're going to come outside of who we are. ... You should be able to handle those emotions appropriately so you can enjoy the moment, but yet go out and execute."

Team captain Smith is a special player and person Kelly says, "He's the kind of guy that you can model as to what your programs look like because of the way he handles himself all the time," Kelly said. "When you're in the mix of changes going on in your program, he has to be a great communicator to the other players, as well. He sometimes has to carry the water, so to speak, in terms of the messages. He'll always be welcome here because of what he's meant to us."

Michael Floyd has repaid his coach's faith in him after screwing up with a drunk driving charge last year

"This is why I coach," Kelly said. "To see a young man change the course of his life, and see that on a day-to-day basis, it's probably as rewarding as any singular victory. And that's what Michael Floyd has done. And that feels good as a coach that you can see a young man who is in a good place. He wasn't in such a good place, but now he is, and that's important."