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    From Aherne to Browne: ten Irish names explained and their crests - a slideshow

    IrishCentral.com has put together a list of the top common Irish surnames with a little explanation of where these names come from. Whether you're looking to trace your family crest or trying to trace your family roots this list will point you in the right direction. Here’s Part 1 of the top common Irish names along with the family crest.

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    From Aherne to Browne: ten Irish names explained and their crests - a slideshow

    1.Aherne - (Ó hEachtighearna/Ó hEachthairn) (each, steed tightearna, lord). Originally Dalcassian, this sept migrated from east Clare to Co. Cork. In County Waterford the English name Hearn is a synonym of Hearn.

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    From Aherne to Browne: ten Irish names explained and their crests - a slideshow

    2.MacAleese - MacGiolla (son of the devotee of Jesus). The name of a prominent Derry sept. There are many variants of the name such as MacIliese, MacLeese, MacLice, MacLise, etc. The best known of this spelling, the painter Daniel MacLise, was a family of the Scottish highlands, know as MacLeish, which settled in Cork.

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    From Aherne to Browne: ten Irish names explained and their crests - a slideshow

    3.Allen - This is usually of Scottish or English origin but sometimes Ó hAillín in Offaly and Tipperary has been anglicized Allen as well as Hallion. Occasionally also in Co. Tipperary. Allen is found as a synonym of Hallinan. As Alleyn it occurs frequently in mediaeval Anglo Irish records. The English name Allen is derived from that of a Welsh saint.

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    From Aherne to Browne: ten Irish names explained and their crests - a slideshow

    4.MacAteer - Mac an tSaoir (saor, craftsman) An Ulster name for which the Scottish MacIntyre, of similar derivation, is widely substituted. Ballymacateer is a place-name in Co. Armagh, which is its homeland. Mac an tSaoir is sometimes anglicized Wright in Fermanagh.

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    From Aherne to Browne: ten Irish names explained and their crests - a slideshow

    5.MacAuley - Awley. There are two distinct septs of this name, viz. MacAmhalghaidh of Offaly and West Meath, and the more numerous MacAmhlaoibh, a branch of the MacGuires which as MacAmhlaoibh gives the form Gawley in Connacht. Both are derived from personal names. The latter must not be confused with MacAuliffe.

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    From Aherne to Browne: ten Irish names explained and their crests - a slideshow

    6.MacAuliffe - Mac Amhlaoibh. An important branch of the McCarthys whose chief was seated at Castle MacAuliffe. The name is almost peculiar to south-west Munster.

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    From Aherne to Browne: ten Irish names explained and their crests - a slideshow

    7.Barry - de Barra. The majority of these names are of Norman origin, i.e. de Barr (a place in Wales); they became completely hibernicized. Though still more numerous in Munster than elsewhere the name is widespread throughout Ireland. Barry is also the anglicized form of Ó Báire (see under Barr) and Ó Beargha (meaning spear-like according to Woulfe) a small sept of Co. Limerick.

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    From Aherne to Browne: ten Irish names explained and their crests - a slideshow

    8.Blake - deBláca (more correctly le Bláca). One of the ‘Tribes of Galway’ an epithet name meaning black which superseded the original Cadell. They are descended from Richard Caddell, Sheriff of Connacht in 1303. They became and long remained very extensive landowners in Co. Galway. Branch settled in Co. Kildare where their name is perpetuated in three town lands called Blakestown.

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    From Aherne to Browne: ten Irish names explained and their crests - a slideshow

    9.Brennan - Ó Braonáin. (The word braon has several meanings, possibly sorrow in this case). The name of four unrelated septs, located in Ossory, east Galway, Kerry and Westmeath. The county Fermanagh sept of Ó Branáin was also anglicized Brennan as well as Brannan.

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    From Aherne to Browne: ten Irish names explained and their crests - a slideshow

    10.O’Brien - Ó Briain. A Dalcassian sept, deriving its name from historical importance from the family of King Brian Boru. Now very numerous in other provinces as well as Munster, being the fifth most numerous name in Ireland. In some cases O’Brien has been made a synonym of O’Byrne and others of the Norman Bryan.

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