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05/08/2013 Second day of Dublin Bus strike. Dublin Bus left up to 230,000 passengers facing major disruption in the city. The strike follows workers rejecting a deal of nearly eur12m in cost savings by the company. People are left stranded at empty bus stops. Photo: Sasko Lazarov/Photocall Ireland Photo by: Photocall Ireland

Five mistakes to avoid while traveling in Ireland

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05/08/2013 Second day of Dublin Bus strike. Dublin Bus left up to 230,000 passengers facing major disruption in the city. The strike follows workers rejecting a deal of nearly eur12m in cost savings by the company. People are left stranded at empty bus stops. Photo: Sasko Lazarov/Photocall Ireland Photo by: Photocall Ireland

When traveling in Ireland, a little bit of local knowledge goes a long way. But remember - if you really want to fit in with the locals, you might want to avoid expressions like "vacationing" - use "going on holiday" instead.

You might also want to include the expression, "Where are yar' lucky charms?" in as many conversations as possible - the Irish will surely love you for that.

Driving

Don't go onto the roundabout (traffic circle) the wrong way round. The rule is you enter to your left, and give way to traffic from your right. And it’s petrol, not gas.

Not going to Northern Ireland

There’s really no excuse not to go to Northern Ireland. Even if you only have a few days, it’s still worth a visit, and Belfast is only a little over two hours away from Dublin by train. Derry (also called Londonderry) is worth checking out – especially at Halloween, when the entire city dresses up in costume.

Visiting Dublin – and only drinking in Temple Bar

Temple Bar is Dublin’s cultural center just south of the River Liffey. It has plenty of museums, stores, bars and restaurants. But all this is best left for the day time. At night, it becomes considerably less attractive. If you are looking for a good night out, try any number of the bars along Camden Street. George’s Street and Wexford Street.

Not going to a hurling or Gaelic football match

Hurling is sometimes described as a cross between lacrosse and hockey, but that doesn’t really do it any justice because it is unlike any other sport in the world. It’s well worth going to see a game – and the same goes for Gaelic football, which looks like a cross between soccer and rugby. The best time to see these games is during the summer when the season's just getting going. It gets increasingly difficult to get tickets towards the end of the season. Dublin’s Croke Park, the main GAA stadium is Ireland, includes a museum that explains the evolution of Ireland’s native sports.

Forgetting to claim your tax back

Taxes are generally already added into the cost of most goods and services in Ireland. As a tourist, you are eligible to reclaim this tax back at the airport – just remember to keep your receipts.

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