Follow this guide to avoid disaster and distract the fairies on your wedding day. Getty Images/iStockphoto

As the summer months pass, a line of beautiful brides will step down the aisle with their objects new, old, borrowed and blue, avoiding their future husband in their dress for fear of bad luck. Yes, modern-day weddings are full of superstitions and traditions but compared to an old Irish wedding day they're a walk in the park. 

From avoiding being whisked away by fairies to choosing the correct person to place the veil on her head, the traditional Irish bride certainly had her work but out for her. 

We look at some of the strangest old wedding traditions upheld in Ireland through the years. 

1. The Honeymoon

The couple drank meade, a honey wine, on their wedding day to promote virility, fertility and to keep the fairies away. The month following the wedding day, the couple would continue to drink the meade and this is apparently where the word honeymoon comes from. 

The origins of the honeymoon.

The origins of the honeymoon.

2. Horseshoes

Irish brides carried a real horseshoe with them on their wedding day for good luck.

Made for quite a heavy handbag.

Made for quite a heavy handbag.

3. The Irish hanky

A lucky Irish Hanky carried by the bride on her wedding day also promoted good luck. The hanky was then turned into a christening bonnet for the first baby with just a few stitches.

Nothing was ever wasted from an Irish wedding. Photo by Getty Images.

Nothing was ever wasted from an Irish wedding. Photo by Getty Images.

4. Wildflowers

Irish brides would often wear a wreath of wildflowers in her hair as well as carrying them in bouquets.

Photo by Getty Images.

Photo by Getty Images.

5. Avoiding the evil eye

It was tradition for the bride and groom to eat salt and oatmeal at the start of the wedding reception to protect them from the evil eye.

Warding away the Evil Eye.

Warding away the Evil Eye.

6. Escaping the fairies

While dancing, the bride was prohibited to take both feet off the floor in case the fairies came and swept her away. Apparently, fairies love brides.

On the lookout for a bride.

On the lookout for a bride.

7. Good photo weather

 To prevent rain on the day of the wedding, the bride’s family put a statue of the Infant of Prague outside the church before the ceremony.

Nobody wants rain on their wedding day.

Nobody wants rain on their wedding day.

8. Good luck vs bad luck

If the bride and groom heard a cuckoo the day of the wedding, it meant good luck for life. If the newlywed couple met a funeral on the road, it meant bad luck for the couple for life.

Sure to end in divorce if you met a funeral on the way. Photo by Getty Images.

Sure to end in divorce if you met a funeral on the way. Photo by Getty Images.

9. The original confetti

Upon leaving the church a wedding guest would throw an old shoe over the bride’s head so she would have good luck.

Confetti sounds much safer.

Confetti sounds much safer.

10. The Mother-in-law

After the wedding ceremony, the bride’s mother in law would break a piece of wedding cake over the bride’s head as she entered the house so both women would be friends for life.

Doesn't sound like the best way to start a friendship.

Doesn't sound like the best way to start a friendship.

11. Placing the veil

It was important that a happily married woman put the veil on the head of the bride so she would be happy in her marriage for life.

Keep unhappy marriages away! Photo by Getty Images.

Keep unhappy marriages away! Photo by Getty Images.

12. Beautiful children

It was said that if a bride looked at the sun when she was leaving her wedding that her children would be beautiful.

Not a good sign if it's raining.

Not a good sign if it's raining.

13. Flashing cash

The groom often tossed a handful of coins into the crowd after the wedding ceremony. It was believed to bring good luck to the newly married couple.

This tradition sounds dangerous. Photo by Getty Images.

This tradition sounds dangerous. Photo by Getty Images.

* Originally published October 2014