Irish filmmaker hits big with pro-fracking documentary now backed by Mark Cuban

Millionaire Mark Cuban now backing Irish filmmakers pro-fracking documentary

FrackNation, the controversial film supportive of  fracking, has secured a television deal and will premiere January 22, 2013 on AXS TV., the cable channel owned by billionaire Mark Cuban.

"We're excited to get the truth to the public," said Irish-born Phelim McAleer, co-director and owner of Hard Boiled Films. "And we're doubly excited to be working with AXS TV.

His wife Ann McElhinney who co-directed states "There has been a lot of talk about fracking in the media—from documentaries to Oscar-contending films such as Promised Land starring Matt Damon and John Krasinski—but what's lacking is honesty and perspective," said McElhinney.

"We talked to people across the country in areas where fracking is happening in their backyard. They all told us the same thing: Fracking is safe and it's saving our community, but the media is ignoring us. We were willing to listen," she added.

FrackNation will broadcast to homes across America. That's exactly what the fracking debate needs."

Hollywood Reporter, the entertainment industry magazine first reported on the deal this morning.

FrackNation features investigative journalist Phelim McAleer on a journey that takes him across America to find the truth about fracking. As he asked environmentalists difficult questions about their often emotional campaigns against fracking, McAleer was met with bogus lawsuits, slammed doors and gun threats.

"FrackNation has been described as the first 'pro-fracking film.' I would describe it as pro-journalism and pro-truth," said McAleer. "It asks hard questions of the environmental movement and its campaigns. And they seem to not like difficult questions."

The film is co-directed by a tightly knit team of three directors: Phelim McAleer, his wife Ann McElhinney and their colleague Magdalena Segieda.

FrackNation was funded through the crowdsourcing website Kickstarter. The filmmakers raised $212,265 from 3,305 backers on Kickstarter on April 6, 2012. It was one of the most successful documentary campaigns in the history of Kickstarter.

"This is a documentary funded by the people for the people," said McAleer.