Albert Lennon and Simon Collins are the names behind the new Wicklow-based company Health and Safety Today

Innovation will be the key to Irish economic regeneration and this week two Irish entrepreneurs may be on the fast track to global success.

The enterprising pair claim to have developed a breakthrough technology that can kill the spread of common airborne pathogens, bacteria and viruses, such as avian and swine flu - by creating a new technology that in effect sterilizes the air.

If their product matches their claims it could have far reaching healthcare, industrial and travel applications around the world.

The new Irish company, Health and Safety Today, has secured all-Ireland distribution rights for their new AirManager technology, which is designed to quickly and efficiently destroy 99 percent of all airborne pathogens and viruses including airborne MRSA.

Irish entrepreneurs Albert Lennon and Simon Collins are the men behind the new Wicklow-based company, Health and Safety Today. The pair claim their AirManager technology will create clean room environments anywhere, from food production lines and raw material storage areas, to hospital wards and even doctor's waiting rooms.

AirManager, the company cliams, can eliminate fumes and smoke, as well as strong odors of any kind in an enclosed atmosphere. It also reduces levels of carbon monoxide and provides biological protection from all common airborne ailments such as flus (avian and swine flus included) colds and even tuberculosis.

"AirManager will bring affordable, high efficiency and scalable air purification clean room technology to a much wider market. Initially, food manufacturing, pharmaceutical and industrial areas will be our focus, while there are plans to see the system roll out to revolutionise patient care through the healthcare system in Ireland," managing director Lennon told the press.

"It’s exciting to think of the impact that a portable unit can have in terms of the quality air inhaled by someone with a severe condition such as cystic fibrosis," Lennon added. "There has been a huge issue regarding the lack of facilities for these patients in Ireland, including private hospital rooms to avoid cross contamination. When combined with best practice, the AirManager will reduce the possibility of these patients becoming cross infected from another patient in a room-share situation."

Currently AirManager technology is being used in doctor's waiting rooms, nursing homes, pubs, flood-damaged buildings and fire-damaged buildings.