Ireland ranks ahead of the US and UK as the 10th best place to grow up in the world

Ireland ranks as one of the best places in the world to grow up

Unicef released the rankings of 29 countries that are apart of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and named Ireland the 10th best place in the world to grow up. The study hopes to reveal the wellness of children in developed countries. 

Unicef found the Netherlands to be the best place for a child to grow up after the long research dating all the way back to 2001. Romania was at the bottom of list but their poor conditions would seem like nothing when compared to child care in most undeveloped countries.  The United Kingdom was said to provide the 16th best childhood and nearing the bottom of the list was the United States at 22nd.

The research perhaps tells to that great Irish personality as 86 percent of children in Ireland are happy with their lives, 83 percent find it easy to talk to their mothers, and 68 percent find it easy to talk to their fathers. 

Ireland also has the highest rate of children exercise and has seen declines in smoking, drinking and teenage pregnancies. 

Some of the unfavorable data revealed Ireland’s biggest childhood obstacles are in obesity and bullying.

Ireland was one of 5 countries to see an increase in bullying over the past 10 years with 28 percent of children saying they were being bullied and nearly a fourth of students wouldn’t describe their peers as kind and respectful. 

Ireland has also seen increases in obesity leading to a 15 percent higher rate than the UK, Germany and France. 

Executive director of Unicef Ireland, Peter Power, said the numbers show “huge progress” in Ireland but points out that, “The growing levels of bullying are a warning to our society to do more to tackle a problem which has devastating and long-lasting effects.”

Power went on to tell the Irish Times “We are in danger of leaving our most vulnerable groups of children behind,” and explained, “It’s vital we don’t forget the children who are behind these statistics who have always been below the poverty line and continue to fall.”